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Digital ICE Explained

The term Digital ICE initially applied specifically to a proprietary technology developed by Kodak's Austin Development Center, formerly Applied Science Fiction (ASF), that automatically removes surface defects, such as dust and scratches, from scanned images.

The ICE technology works from within the scanner, so unlike the software-only solutions it does not alter any underlying details of the image. The ICE technology uses a scanner with a pair of light sources, a normal RGB lamp and an infrared (IR) lamp, and scans twice, once with each lamp. The IR lamp detects the dust locations with its unique detection method, and then inpainting is applied based on this data afterwards. The general concept is to subtract the position of scratches and dust from the RGB image.

Digital ICE is used to detect scratches and dust during transparent film scan and is not applicable for opaque document scanning. While chromogenic black-and-white films are supported by Digital ICE, other black-and-white films containing metallic silver, which form from silver halides during the development process of the film, are not. This is because the long wave infrared light passes through the slide but not through dust particles. The silver particles reflect the infrared light in a similar manner to dust particles, thus respond equally in visible light and infrared. A similar phenomenon also prevents Kodak Kodachrome slides from being scanned with Digital ICE. Kodachrome's cyan layer absorbs infrared.
- Wikipedia

Our expereince has shown us that our hardware and Silverfast software solution has produced very good results using Digital ICE even with Kodachrome slides. As most slides have a build up of dust and grime that can't be removed by air blowing, Digital ICE is recommended for best results.

Photo Digital Services offer Digital ICE within our pricing of slides and negatives. Please let us know if you don't require the use of this service

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